By Jacques Maritain

Art and Scholasticism is Jacques Maritain’s vintage argument for an target view of either artwork and the artist. Maritain presents a robust dissenting point of view at the lazy, self-flattering creative assumptions of the earlier centuries. For this new version, Brian Barbour’s creation offers a desirable precis of Maritain’s philosophical historical past, his conversion to Catholicism and paintings in Thomistic notion, and the significance of Art and Scholasticism in figuring out aesthetics—be it in poetry, portray, tune, or literature. Art and Scholasticism is a must-read for fanatics of artwork and knowledge alike. See our different books at www.clunymedia.com!

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The Prudent Man as such, on the other hand, judging as he does all things under the angle of morality and in relation to the good of man, is absolutely ignorant of all that pertains to art. He can, no doubt, and he must, judge the work of art insofar as it concerns morality: [163] he has no right to judge it as a work of art. The work of art is the occasion for a unique conflict of virtues. Prudence, which considers it in its relation to morality, deserves on better grounds than Art the name of virtue,[164] for, like every moral virtue, it causes the man who acts to be good -- purely and simply good.

But art does not reside in an angelic mind; it resides in a soul which animates a living body, and which, by the natural necessity in which it finds itself of learning, and progressing little by little and with the assistance of others, makes the rational animal a naturally social animal. Art is therefore basically dependent upon everything which the human community, spiritual tradition and history transmit to the body and mind of man. By its human subject and its human roots, art belongs to a time and a country.

162] But if this analogy invests the artist with a unique nobility, and explains the admiration he enjoys among men, it runs the risk of leading him pitiably astray and of having him place his treasure and his heart in a phantom, ubi aerugo et tinea demolitur. The Prudent Man as such, on the other hand, judging as he does all things under the angle of morality and in relation to the good of man, is absolutely ignorant of all that pertains to art. He can, no doubt, and he must, judge the work of art insofar as it concerns morality: [163] he has no right to judge it as a work of art.

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